INCLUDEnyc BLOG

The Limitless Future of Accessible Design

“I have revisited the museum’s exhibits and each time come away with a new understanding of the role that thoughtful design can play in our everyday lives. ”

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Independence and INCLUDEnyc

“If I had to give someone some advice about living independently, I’d say they should be helpful, like do their groceries and their laundry and the dishes.”

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What all parents want for their children

As you can imagine, I want for Annie what all parents want for their children: to pave the way toward a bright future, help them achieve their full potential, and be fully included in school, work, and community life. 

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House on a hill: My 23-year journey with INCLUDEnyc

I hesitated in fear for a minute, but like any parent of a child with a disability that has struggled through the system and come out on the other side, there was tremendous motivation to use the hard fought, hard won knowledge to help others. That personal experience was the first step to qualify me to be the person on the other end of the phone with parents

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Rethinking language and disability: My evening with disability rights lawyer Haben Girma

The semantics of words such as "special needs” and “differently-abled,” or what Haben called "linguistics gymnastics," perpetuate the belief that individuals with disabilities are separate from non-disabled individuals and this kind of language prevents inclusion.

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It’s Mandarin to Me: When IEPs are not translated into a parent’s native language

Looking at this IEP in Mandarin was truly humbling and enlightening at the same time. It was gibberish to me, even though I want to learn this language one day. I have seen many IEPs written in English and some (painfully few) in Spanish, my native language, but I had never stopped to look closely at one written in a language that I truly do not understand. 

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Navigating the system: How INCLUDEnyc pulled me through

Before this moment, I had never stopped to think about what I felt he needed; I realized that what I wanted was for him to have peers that he could learn and model from and I wanted him to be given opportunities to learn new ways to handle situations, but most importantly, I wanted him to have the opportunity to be in an inclusive environment.

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The last word

Technology has changed how I can communicate with them, especially with my brother.

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Fighting for what’s right for Julian: How I got the right school placement for my son with autism

I share this to encourage parents to trust their instincts, as we know our children best. Nothing is set in stone, and sometimes what we originally think is best may not be, and that’s ok. We as parents are our children’s best advocates. We are their voice.

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The importance of recreation: Gearing up for the INCLUDEnyc Fair

My mother taught me that socialization is as important as academics and every child deserves to be included, regardless of wealth or ability.

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