INCLUDEnyc BLOG

Why Disability Isn’t A Deficit

When I reveal that my son has a disability, I’m showered with both pity and concern. “That must be so hard,” I’m told. I never really know how to respond in those situations, so I usually just talk about all of the amazing progress he has made.

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Students of Color and Disability Classifications

Many times, students of color are overrepresented in some of the official 13 disability classifications and underrepresented in others. Nationally, for example, fewer African American students are classified under “ADHD” than white students. Likewise, they are underrepresented in the category of “Autism” and overrepresented in the “Emotional Disturbance” category.

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Autism, Race, and the Media

We have many conversations—sometimes controversial ones—in the autism community. High Functioning vs. Low Functioning. Atypical vs. Neurotypical. Public School vs. Private School. Vaccinations and autism. We don’t often talk about the lack of minority representation in the media. It seems to be taboo.

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Her Son Deserves Access and She Won’t Settle

“I’ll go into that IEP meeting with an agenda, my own goals, and questions. Whether its busing or services, my son deserves access and I won’t settle for less.” 

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What the Turning 5 Process Taught Me

I will always be ready and willing to advocate for him in any way I can and he will always show me what it’s like to be fearless and brave.

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Students with Disabilities Among Most Segregated in NYC Schools

As a parent to Jack and through my professional work, I live with the implications of student segregation everyday. As a result, I push for systemic policy and cultural changes for better outcomes for the more than 250,000 students with disabilities in New York City.

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We Have High Expectations for Everyone

“As a swim instructor and manager at other companies, I was disheartened by how low the expectations were for children with disabilities. I founded REACHswim on the principle that children with disabilities can be trained like anyone else,” said Florencio Flores Palomo, Executive Director & Founder of REACHswim.

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School in NYC for Newly Arrived Students

There is a crack in the architecture for students with disabilities who arrive in the US over-age (say, between 17-21) and under-credited.

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Creating Community at Camp

“At school, kids can feel bullied. At camp, kids are in a safe space where they can share their experiences, make friends and be themselves,” David said.

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Kids with Disabilities Shouldn’t Have to Fit into Society’s Mold

“Extreme Kids is an open, welcoming place. We believe society can learn a lot from the children and families coming into our space. Kids with disabilities shouldn’t have to fit into society’s mold. Instead, classrooms and the broader community should be more open to neurodiversity,” says Executive Director Caitlin Cassaro.

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